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Waukesha parade carnage comes just over 6 years after similar attack in Oklahoma with eerie similarities

Waukesha parade suspect Darrell Brooks Jr. is being held on $5 million bail in a Wisconsin jail after allegedly mowing down dozens of people, including senior citizens and children, Sunday evening in a red Ford Escape.

The 39-year-old career criminal faces life in prison if convicted on the charges prosecutors have already announced against him and more are expected. 

There was similar carnage six years ago last month when Adacia Chambers, now 31, plowed through the 2015 homecoming parade at Oklahoma State University.

Adacia Chambers, inset, plowed through the 2015 homecoming parade at Oklahoma State University, killing four and injuring dozens. Like the Waukesha attack, her victims included children and senior citizens.

Adacia Chambers, inset, plowed through the 2015 homecoming parade at Oklahoma State University, killing four and injuring dozens. Like the Waukesha attack, her victims included children and senior citizens.
(Mark Hoffman/Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel via AP/Stillwater Police Department/Handout via Reuters )

SHIVERING WAUKESHA SUSPECT DARRELL BROOKS HAD NO SHOES, JACKET ASKING FOR HELP AFTER HORROR, COUPLE SAYS

Then-25-year-old Chambers drove a grey Hyundai Elantra through a red light and then a police barricade in Stillwater, Oklahoma, as spectators lined Main Street for a parade. An arrest affidavit states that once through the barricade, she sped into a parked police motorcycle without slowing down.

Witnesses reported seeing bodies thrown around “like rag dolls,” and she ultimately killed four people, including a 2-year-old, and injured 50, according to authorities.

The dead were 23-year-old student Nakita Prabhakar Nakal; Bonnie Jean and Marvin Lyle Stone, both 65; and Nash Lucas, the toddler son of an OSU student.

MEET THE OFFICIAL WHO AGREED TO $1G BAIL FOR DARRELL BROOKS AHEAD OF CHRISTMAS CARNAGE

Nine of the surviving victims were under 10 years old, including at least one additional toddler, the Associated Press reported at the time.

Chambers is serving a life sentence in prison after pleading no contest to four counts of second-degree murder and dozens of assault charges in 2017, court records show. 

A memorial at Veterans Park for the victims of Sunday's deadly Christmas parade crash in Waukesha,  Wisconsin.

A memorial at Veterans Park for the victims of Sunday’s deadly Christmas parade crash in Waukesha,  Wisconsin.
(AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)

CRIMINAL SUSPECTED IN WAUKESHA PARADE ATTACK RAPPED ‘F— DONALD TRUMP’ AND SUPPORTERS, GLORIFIED VIOLENCE

Chambers’ defense attorney, Tony Coleman, said Chambers was struggling with mental illness at the time of the incident. Chambers told police after the carnage that she was having suicidal thoughts, according to the affidavit.

Brooks also faces life in prison if convicted in Sunday’s Christmas parade carnage in Waukesha, Wisconsin.

While fleeing from an apparent domestic incident, he allegedly slammed through a barricade and then swerved into a crowd of people on Main Street, killing five adults and an 8-year-old and injuring 62, according to authorities.

Brooks, a longtime convicted felon with a 50-page rap sheet, had been released from a Milwaukee jail just days before the parade attack on just $1,000 bail. Even District Attorney John Chisholm called that sum “inappropriately low” and launched an internal investigation into his own office for recommending it.

Five adult victims killed in the Waukesha parade attack. A sixth victim, a child, was announced in court Tuesday.

Five adult victims killed in the Waukesha parade attack. A sixth victim, a child, was announced in court Tuesday.

John Gross, a defense attorney and clinical associate professor at the University of Wisconsin Law School, said the Christmas parade attack seemed inexplicable.

“I would almost think the person would be mentally ill to do this,” he said. “But who knows about that?”

Regardless, Gross said a conviction and life prison sentence seem likely.

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“As a defense attorney, I cannot imagine a possible defense that he would have to these charges,” Gross said. “Maybe at sentencing, he’ll say something about what caused him to do this. And maybe that will bring some closure for some folks. But it’s really hard to even imagine what he could say to give people context or closure for an act that’s so bizarre and violent — and unjustifiable.”

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