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Summary of inter-Korean news this week

SEOUL, Oct. 22 (Yonhap) — The following is a summary of inter-Korean news this week.

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NSC calls for efforts for stability after N. Korea’s SLBM test

SEOUL — Ensuring stability on the Korean Peninsula is the most important goal in handling issues surrounding North Korea, the presidential National Security Council (NSC) said Friday, after the North’s test of a submarine-launched ballistic missile.

National security adviser Suh Hoon made the remarks while presiding over a regular NSC meeting, days after North Korea test-fired a new type of submarine-launched ballistic missile, marking the North’s latest weapons test in recent weeks.

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(LEAD) FM Chung says N. Korea sanctions relief can be an option if it accepts dialogue offer

SEOUL — North Korea’s recent missile test underscores the need for engaging the reclusive state and sanctions relief can be considered as part of incentives to bring it back to the negotiating table, Seoul’s top diplomat said Wednesday.

Foreign Minister Chung Eui-yong was speaking at a parliamentary audit session, hours after the North said it has successfully test-fired a new type of submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) on Tuesday.

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(3rd LD) NSC expresses ‘deep regret’ over N. Korea’s presumed SLBM test

SEOUL– South Korea’s presidential National Security Council (NSC) expressed “deep regret” Tuesday over North Korea’s presumed test of a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) and urged Pyongyang to return to peace talks at an early date.

National security adviser Suh Hoon presided over the 70-minute NSC meeting shortly after the North fired the missile into the East Sea, and was briefed by Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Won In-choul, according to Cheong Wa Dae.

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Seoul closely monitoring N. Korean leader’s increased messages toward U.S.: ministry

SEOUL — North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has publicly mentioned the United States more often recently, drawing attention to Pyongyang’s next move amid a prolonged deadlock in their nuclear talks, according to South Korea’s unification ministry Monday.

The ministry made the assessment in a report to lawmakers for an annual parliamentary audit, calling for an “active response” to resume dialogue in the face of growing volatility in the region.
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