in ,

Cuomo should resign or be impeached, 59% of New Yorkers say in new poll

Most New Yorkers want Gov. Andrew Cuomo to resign, according to a new snap poll conducted hours after the release of a bombshell report that the three-term Democratic governor sexually harassed multiple women.

A Marist Poll released Wednesday morning indicates that 59% of New Yorkers, including 52% of registered Democrats, say Cuomo should resign. And if the governor doesn’t step down, nearly six in ten say he should be impeached.

CUOMO DEFIANTLY DENIES ALLEGATIONS, RESISTS CALLS TO RESIGN

Less than a third of those questioned in the survey say Cuomo should serve out the remainder of his term, which lasts through the end of next year.

The survey was conducted on Tuesday night, following the announcement by New York Attorney General Letitia James that her office’s investigation into sexual harassment allegations against Cuomo – which included interviews with 179 people – determined that the governor sexually harassed current and former staff members, from 2013 through last year.

Cuomo, who is also facing a federal probe into whether his administration covered up the COVID-19 deaths of nursing home residents amid the coronavirus pandemic, has been urged for months to step down by scores of state lawmakers and nearly the entire congressional delegation from New York — including Democratic Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand.

Renewed and expanded calls for Cuomo to resign – including from President Biden – came flooding in following the release of the attorney general’s investigation. But hours after the release of the report, Cuomo forcefully denied the allegations and ignored the chorus of calls to step down.

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT IF CUOMO DOESN’T RESIGN

Forty-four percent of those surveyed say Cuomo did something illegal, while nearly three in then say the governor did something unethical but not illegal. Just 7% offered that Cuomo did nothing wrong.

It’s been 13 years since a New York governor has resigned. Then-Democratic Gov. Elliot Spitzer stepped down in early 2008 after admitting to having extramarital affairs with sex workers. And it’s been more than a century since a New York governor has been impeached and removed from office.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during a news conference, Tuesday, May 11, 2021, in New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during a news conference, Tuesday, May 11, 2021, in New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
(AP)

If Cuomo were to step down or is removed from office through impeachment, he would be succeed by New York Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul, who would make history as the state’s first female governor.

WHO WOULD TAKE OVER IF CUOMO RESIGNS OR IS OUSTED THROUGH IMPEACHMENT

Cuomo was easily reelected in 2018 in blue state New York. The state doesn’t have gubernatorial limits, and Cuomo said in May of 2019 that he would run in 2022 for a fourth term. He’s built a massive $18.5 million campaign war chest by the end of June, but he’s yet to formally confirm or announce that he’s seeking another term in office. But only 11% of New Yorkers, including 12% of registered voters, say Cuomo deserves to be reelected, while more than three-quarters say it’s time for a new governor.

“The court of public opinion believes the allegations against Governor Cuomo warrant his removal from office,” Marist Poll director Lee M. Miringoff said. “If he does not resign, nearly six in ten New Yorkers believe he should be impeached. Even if he survives this scandal, his reelection prospects are rock bottom with even his Democratic base deserting him.”

The Marist Poll questioned 614 adult New Yorkers, including 542 registered voters. The survey’s overall sampling error is plus or minus 5.1 percentage points.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Overnight” or “snap” polls measure instant, emotional reactions — and those reactions may change.  The public’s views can change in the days following a news event as people are exposed to coverage, chat with friends and co-workers, and just generally digest and think about the news.  

 Fox News’ Victoria Balara contributed to this report

Reference