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Coronavirus lockdowns give major boost to global e-commerce



PARIS: While large traditional retailers announce big layoffs because of the pandemic, sometimes shedding thousands of staff, coronavirus lockdowns have in contrast given e-commerce a major boost.

Recent data shows a shift to shopping online — according to Kantar consulting group, international e-commerce grew 41 percent in only three months compared with 22 percent growth for 2020 as a whole to date, as the pandemic “transformed” retail habits.

The trend was brought into sharp relief on August 18, when British high street mainstay Marks & Spencer announced it was culling 7,000 staff.

Hours later, in contrast, online behemoth Amazon said it was hiring 3,500 in the United States.

The M&S slimdown is only one part of the picture in the UK, with 2,500 more job losses announced at department store Debenhams, which in April entered administration for the second time in a year. Hundreds more jobs are also to be lost at other well known British high street chains.

By contrast, Britain’s largest supermarket chain Tesco placed a sizeable feather in its online cap by saying it was creating 16,000 permanent jobs to deal with strong growth in its online activities.

“It is very clear that the digitization of commerce, (even) if in place for a long time, is accelerating enormously,” said Herve Gilg, managing director and distribution specialist at Alvarez & Marsal corporate transformation services.

The benefits are being reaped by those companies which were already carrying out a sizeable chunk of their activities online.

That troupe is led by Amazon, which doubled its net profits in the second half of this virus-challenged year.

Following was Germany’s fashion and lifestyle e-commerce heavyweight Zalando, which saw its active customer base rise 20 percent in first half 2020 to 34 million.

US giant Walmart, although not an online “pure player,” has also shifted in that direction to benefit from the upswing in virtual commerce in the US and its second quarter results soared past estimates on an e-sales jump of 97 percent.

In France, the United Kingdom, Spain and China, the average market share of e-commerce went from 8.8 percent of value (in 2019) to 12.4 percent in second quarter 2020, said Kantar.

It added that in China, online shopping already amounts to “a quarter of expenditure on mass consumer products.”

The trend was already under way before COVID-19 began to batter the global economy.

But the brutal falloff in out-of-home spending has had “a major knock-on effect for nonfood commerce dependent on physical sale points,” Gilg said.

Reference